http://globalnews.ca/news/624775/watch-dentists-moonlighting-as-orthodontists-can-make-for-costly-smile/

Aside from our wisdom teeth, we have 28 teeth in our mouth.  The biomechanics of moving each and every one of these teeth harmoniously is complicated and a formidable task.  The challenge is to carefully position both the crowns and roots of each tooth in a straight and stable position in three dimensions of space in the cranio-facial skeleton allowing for the hills and valleys (cusps and grooves) of the teeth to interdigitate with one another well, and the muscles and soft tissue are relaxed and in a comfortable position.

In addition to this, the upper and lower teeth in the upper and lower jaws have to fit together so the forces of the bite is evenly distributed throughout all of the teeth.   This is a task that cannot be acquired from a weekend course or two by a general dentist.  This is a very involved and complicated task that requires much planning and careful execution and a task that should  be entrusted only  to a certified specialist in orthodontics who undertakes an accredited  post-graduate degree in orthodontics.

 

If you’re interested in having all 28 teeth in your mouth straight and a comfortable bite, please ensure you consult with a certified specialist in orthodontics. Just like you want a cardiac surgeon, not your family doctor, to perform heart surgery, you want a certified orthodontist to do your braces.

 

If you have questions please give Orthodontics at Don Mills a call at 416-447-1515 for a complimentary consultation.  We are team of committed professionals who look forward to meeting with you, listening to your concerns and discussing your options with you.

 

Scarborough orthodontist

Baby teeth Dr. James Noble Toronto Orthodontist

With so many diapers to change and so little sleep, your infant’s dental health may not be top of mind — even after those first baby teeth make an appearance.

But the eruption of that first tooth, between the ages of 3 and 9 months, should be a signal to parents to schedule a child’s first dental appointment — and one should be scheduled no later than age 1, according to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

“We want (parents) to be aware that a newborn’s teeth are already developing,” says Dr. Art Nowak, one expert attending the AAPD conference in Orlando last week. “Parents can’t see them, but they are there under the gums.”

A whopping 97% of parents were unaware of the first-year, first-visit recommendation.

But there are compelling reasons for early checkups. Tooth decay is a leading chronic childhood disease — more common than asthma — and it’s almost entirely preventable.

“I remind parents that this is a very important time,” says Dr. Beverly Largent, a pediatric dentist in Paducah, Kentucky. “This baby is 1 year old or younger. They have new teeth. You are starting from the very beginning. And you have all the power in the world to keep your child from ever having a cavity.”

During the first visit, pediatric dentists evaluate the child and ward off risks. Before a baby even arrives, pediatric dentists encourage expectant parents to get their own teeth checked. In addition, pediatricians and other health care providers are advised to tell parents the importance of wiping a newborn’s mouth clean after each feeding — something that may not occur to new moms.

Since acid-producting bacteria, called streptococcus mutans, is contagious, pediatric dentists caution parents against blowing on a baby’s food or cleaning a pacifier with saliva.

“As soon as the tooth erupts, bacteria start developing plaque,” Nowak says. “Whether it’s from the mother’s milk or formula, activity starts inside that plaque. In no time at all, that activity creates acid and that starts the whole disease process. At 5, 6, 7 months, things are starting to happen.”

If you notice a white spot or discoloration on a baby tooth, “that means there could be a problem developing,” says Dr. Warren Brill, newly elected AAPD president, and the child should see a dentist right away.

Left untreated, what’s termed “early dental caries” — the first stage of tooth decay — can destroy tiny teeth and lead to infection, pain, and lifelong consequences. It can even be fatal in rare cases. Several children in recent years have died from abscesses or from surgical sedation to repair decayed teeth, dentists say.

The reality is, “baby teeth” need to stay put well beyond infancy and the toddler years. “In fact, some of those baby teeth are still in place when the child goes to middle school,” says Largent. “If not properly cared for, those teeth can cause a lot of trauma. They are important to help your child look good, eat well and speak well.”

Some dental health tips for parents:

Establish a routine: Lifting the child’s lip, wiping the mouth and inspecting the gums and teeth should be done regularly, dentists say.

“That gives the baby a lot of things — it gives them the expectation and familiarity of the parent checking inside their mouth,” Largent says. “And it gives them the experience of feeling clean.”

Begin brushing with the first tooth: And begin flossing daily as teeth line up, doctors say. The child will likely fuss or cry, but don’t let that deter you.

“You have to brush their teeth for them,” says Dr. Kevin Donly, who practices in San Antonio. “Kids don’t have the manual dexterity until they’re between 5 and 7 years old. I think a lot of parents really don’t realize that. Even when your child thinks they can brush their own teeth, your job is to go back and re-brush for them.”

Find a dental home: Having a pediatric dentist means parents know where to go and who to call in an emergency.

“By the time (children) are 12 to 14 months, they’re mobile. They are going to fall — and sometimes they fall forward,” says Nowak. “With today’s technology, we can tell parents, ‘Send me a picture from your smartphone.’ If there’s something we need to do, we’ll have them come in.”

Avoid sugary drinks and use water to transition from bottle to cup: “Parents roll their eyes at me when I say, ‘You can’t put your child to bed with juice,’ ” Largent says. “Sometimes, when children come in and their mouths are ravaged, I go so far as to say to the parent, ‘This has to stop, tonight.’ “

Remember that preventative care pays: Costs are 40% lower in the first five years for children who have their first dental visit before age 1, the AAPD estimates.

Pediatric dentists aim to make that first exam as standard as any other medical checkup during the first year of life.

“Those cavity-free visits are marvelous. They’re great for parents, there’s no stress involved. They’re great for kids, there’s no stress involved. And, they are great for me because then I’m the best dentist in the world,” says Largent.

“When I see a new mom, I want to give her some basic tools: I want her to know that she has to brush his teeth every day. I want her to know she’s not being a bad mom if he cries while she’s brushing his teeth. My goal is that her child will never have tooth decay.”

see full article at: http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/28/health/baby-dental-health/index.html?sr=sharebar_facebook

Today I had the privilege of meeting with Grace Ianucci and Elroy Officer who are both Senior Faculty in the dental assistants program at George Brown College in Toronto. I received a very gracious welcome from these wonderful teachers and a tour of their brand new impressive facility located on the Lakeshore in downtown Toronto.

I learned that Ontario is the only Canadian province where the provincial government does not consider dental assistants as a regulated health profession. 8 provinces have considered dental assistants a regulated profession since the 70’s! Further, Ontario has the largest membership of Dental assistant’s by far, with over 8600 registered members! http://www.odaa.org/Document.aspx?ID=28

The good news is that the Health Professionals Regulatory Advisory Council (HPRAC) of Ontario invited Dental assistant’s to submit a proposal to regulate dental assistants under the Regulated Health Professions Act (RHPA).  This will allow dental assistants to define the scope of their duties that would change the archaic Dentistry Act of 1991. http://www.hprac.org/en/projects/Dental_Assistants.asp

Dentists would therefore be required to only hire registered dental assistants to perform the tasks defined in their scope of practice ex. Taking x-rays, suctioning, sealants, rubber-dam placement, the list goes on.  This ofcourse would protect all patients in the dental office.  Unfortunately, there have been numerous delays in since 2011 mostly because of the backwards thinking of then Minister of the then Minister of health David Caplan. The current Minister has stated that she requires HPRAC advise on the issue of Dental Assistants by December 31, 2013.  The 8600 Dental assistant’s are anxiously waiting for this decision and to finally be a regulated health profession.

I have the privilege of working with dental assistants day in and day out and they are talented, skilled, gifted, professional, knowledgeable and passionate about dentistry. Dental assistant’s have extensive training and are truly the heartbeat of the dental office.  Ontario has to get with the times!  Dental assistants deserve to be a regulated body and have my 100% support and I ask you to support them as well by following this important issue. Social media is a great way to spread the word so everyone can be aware of this important issue.

James Noble

May 28th, 2013

There are a lot of important reasons why wisdom teeth should be removed, but removing your wisdom teeth will not prevent your teeth from becoming crooked. Contrary to popular opinion, wisdom teeth do not cause crowding of teeth. It’s one of those things that makes sense if you think about it, but the truth is that it doesn’t happen. Here’s evidence including the highest level of evidence which is a Cochrane review…and you can’t argue with scientific evidence.

http://summaries.cochrane.org/CD003879/surgical-removal-versus-retention-for-the-management-of-asymptomatic-impacted-wisdom-teeth

1. Fastlicht (1970) found that in orthodontically treated subjects, only 11% had wisdom teeth present but 86% still had a relapse of lower anterior crowing after treatment.
2. Kaplan (1974) concluded that the presence of third molars does not produce a greater degree anterior crowding after the cessation of retention.
3. Little (1981) observed that 90% of patients treated orthodontically with extractions relapsed with lower anterior crowding.
4. Lifshitz (1982) evaluated lower anterior crowding in patients with lower premolar extraction in the presence or absence of lower third molars, and concluded that a relapse of crowding occurs after treatment regardless of whether lower premolars were extracted or third molars were present.
5. Linqvist and Thilander (1982) reported that patients with prophylactic removal of wisdom teeth had similar relapse of lower anterior alignment than those with wisdom teeth present.
6. Ades et al. (1990) reported no difference in mandibular growth pattern whether wisdom teeth were erupted, impacted, or missing, and concluded that there is no basis for recommending third molar extractions to alleviate or prevent mandibular incisor crowding.
7. Southard et al. (1991) found that the surgical removal of third molars did not have an effect on contact tightness.
8. Pirttiniemi et al. (1994) evaluated the effect of removal of impacted wisdom teeth on subjects in their third decade of life (30-39 years of age) and found that wisdom tooth extraction had no significant change in the lower anterior area.

Buyer Beware!!!

Despite what you may read on the internet or what you may even be told by a dental professional, not every patient can be treated effectively with Invisalign.  There is mis-information and dis-information on the internet which can be a dangerous place.  The goal of orthodontic treatment should not only be the alignment of the teeth, but correction of the bite, and Invisalign cannot always achieve these goals and traditional braces may be necessary.  To determine if you are truly a candidate for Invisalign, you can contact our office for a complimentary consultation.

Orthodontic treatment should not be like shopping for toys or clothes.  You should trust your smile and bite only to a certified orthodontist who has an additional three years of training and who knows how to effectively move teeth with controlled forces in three dimensions.  Check this out: http://www.mylifemysmile.org/.  An orthodontist is the smart choice.  We are specialists in straightening your teeth and aligning your bite.

If you have questions about Invisalign, or would like to find out if you are a candidate for Invisalign treatment, please give us a call at our Toronto office at 416-447-1515 for a complimentary consultation.

We at Orthodontics at Don Mills are a team of professionals who are committed to listening to your orthodontic concerns and discussing your options with you.   We look forward to meeting with you.

Aside from our wisdom teeth, we have 28 teeth in our mouth.  The biomechanics of moving each and every one of these teeth harmoniously is complicated and a formidable task.  The challenge is to carefully position both the crowns and roots of each tooth in a straight and stable position in three dimensions of space in the cranio-facial skeleton allowing for the hills and valleys (cusps and grooves) of the teeth to interdigitate with one another well, and the muscles and soft tissue are relaxed and in a comfortable position.

In addition to this, the upper and lower teeth in the upper and lower jaws have to fit together so the forces of the bite is evenly distributed throughout all of the teeth.   This is a task that cannot be acquired from a weekend course or two by a general dentist.  This is a very involved and complicated task that requires much planning and careful execution and a task that should  be entrusted only  to a certified specialist in orthodontics (look for the FRCD(C) designation to ensure you’re being treated by a specialist) who undertakes an accredited 3 year post-graduate degree in orthodontics and who has undergone extensive study to pass very rigorous examination by the Royal College of Dental Specialist’s of Canada.

If you’re interested in having all 28 teeth in your mouth straight and a comfortable bite, please ensure you consult with a certified specialist in orthodontics. Just like you want a cardiac surgeon, not your family doctor, to perform heart surgery, you want a certified orthodontist to do your braces.  Look for the FRCD(C) designation to ensure you are treated by a certified orthodontic specialist.

If you have questions please give Orthodontics at Don Mills a call at 416-447-1515 for a complimentary consultation.  We are team of committed professionals who look forward to meeting with you, listening to your concerns and discussing your options with you.

Orthodontics at Don Mills was honoured to have Dr. Noble and Dr. Cassolato’s long-time friend Rita Bauer visit our office today. Rita is the world expert in digital dental photography and she shared her insight with us to perfect our clinical photographs so we can better serve you. Thanks Rita, you ARE GREAT!

Rita Bauer visits Orthodontics at Don Mills to perfect orthodontic photographic technique.

Rita Bauer visits Orthodontics at Don Mills to perfect orthodontic photographic technique.

Attached to this post is Dr. Noble’s recent publication in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association hot off the press.  The article is intended for the general dentist to manage orthodontic patients who present with emergencies in the dental office but will be of interest to our patients as well.

If you have any emergencies whatsoever, please call the office to coordinate an appointment so we can attend to it as soon as possible.  Dr. Noble is on-call 24.7 for all of the orthodontic patients at Orthodontics at Don Mills and can be reached on his personal cell directly for any questions or concerns that might arrive after hours.

Managing Pain Caused by Orthodontic Appliances Oasis_Noble_ english_ FINAL

Welcome Treena!

Welcome Treena!

We are overjoyed to offer the warmest welcome to Treena, the newest member of the Orthodontics at Don Mills Team!  Treena moved to Toronto from Halifax in November with her husband Jayson and baby daughter Caroline and she has just come off her maternity leave.  Treena brings a warm smile and the friendly Maritime charm and cheer to our dynamic team.   She also brings an incredible knowledge of orthodontics with her, having worked in orthodontics for 10 years in Dartmouth with Dr. Noble’s good friend and colleague in Nova Scotia, Dr. Stuart.  Please offer Treena a warm welcome at your next appointment.  She can’t wait to meet you at your next visit!  Welcome Treena!

No matter who you are in this world, if you have burning desire for something that you dream in, and if you put your mind and all your energy to achieve that goal, your dreams can come true, no matter what obstacles you may have and no matter who may tell you otherwise.  Here’s a beautiful example of a story about Tim who wanted to open up his own restaurant.  You will choose Tim’s Place over Tim Horton’s any day of the week, not because of the food, but because of the way Tim treats his customers.   Tim was told he couldn’t have his own restaurant.  He certainly proved them wrong.